Proportions: 2:3, 4:3 or square?

 As you can see, your camera produces photos with a specific format (image size). In most cases, the format has sides with a ratio of 4:3. However, there are cameras that allow you to choose different formats: 4:3; 2:3 (same as traditional photography on 35 mm film); 16:9 (cinematography format) or 1:1 (square). I also advise you to maintain the same ratio when cropping your images.

Vincenzo Cammarata

 

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Time to print!

While some people print their photos, many prefer free publication on Facebook to printing on paper, which if done well – on a “fine art” level – can cost quite a lot. If you choose to print, you must prepare your files properly for the printer, as the image could become a work of art or a gift. It is actually quite simple: just export the file with the appropriate resolution for making good prints, such as 300 dpi 1:1 (i.e. real size).

Vincenzo Cammarata

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Are you travelling? Find a story!

Sometimes when we are travelling, we get the feeling that our photos are disorganised or have no common thread except for their timeline. To discover interesting subjects, facilitate your photography and take full advantage of your trip, find some stories to focus on (either before or during the trip). For example, something that you have read in a guidebook, such as what happened with the Taxi Sisters in Dakar during my trip to Senegal.

Vincenzo Cammarata

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Hot or cold?

Photos taken in the artificial light of regular bulbs often come out yellow. This is because light does not always have the same “temperature” (or colour). The white of artificial light varies a lot from the yellow of regular bulbs to the blue of neon or fluorescent tubes. White balance can be regulated prior to shooting by using the camera’s presets or by setting the exact temperature in Kelvin degrees. You also have the option of setting the white balance to automatic (the AWB function) and adjusting it later in post-production.

Vincenzo Cammarata

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